moonShine submissions time!

moonShine review

Time to pull out those stories—whether from the file cabinet or the inner workings of you mind—and send them to moonShine review! The next deadline, September 15th, is right around the corner, so don’t delay. We accept creative prose (fiction and nonfiction) of 3,000 words or less—and look more favorably at pieces 2,500 words or less. Be sure to check out our submissions guidelines for all of our requirements at https://moonshinereview.wordpress.com/main/.

We had an incredible issue last time because we had so many great submissions! So, gather those stories and send them our way today!

Anne Kaylor & Beth Ann Cagle

View original post

Advertisements
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Breaking into Poetry: Suggestions for New Poets

Beth A. Cagle

Suggestions for Poets Who Want to be Successful
By Beth Ann Cagle

How does one become a better poet and serious writer? It’s a tough question, and the answers are unlimited. Although you may already be aware of some of the ideas in the article below, the suggestions are multi-fold. Here are some of the things successful poets have tried out to help them become better poets and more serious writers.

• Poets are on fire for poetry! They make it a major component in everyday life by reading and writing more poetry.
• They meet other poets. See what others are doing with their poetry, and make themselves known in the local community by joining poetry readings, classes, and workshops.
• They attend (and can teach) classes and workshops directed specifically at teaching modern poetry as they learn to work with new styles they discover. There are a wide…

View original post 585 more words

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Grace Constantly Recurring – Tony & Annalee

Love writing or teaching? You’ll love this piece, compliments of poet Bill Griffin.

griffinpoetry

green vertebrae cradling all the wood-bone of your years

Poetry exalts. Yes, that’s right, it transports you up and out of dreary into ethereal. No it doesn’t. That’s all wrong. Poetry grounds you. It brings you right on down to where you can plunge fingers and toes into clay, grow roots. How else could you ever expect to leave? Still wrong. Think again. Poetry doesn’t change you at all. It catches you in the moment, this moment, right now, and shows you the you you really are.

So who’s right? How about this: Poetry = Salt. Here’s what the cookbook says – “salt makes food taste more like itself.” Poetry? Makes life taste more like itself. I’m sitting here eating a bowl of lentils. Onion, tomato, even the bay leaf can’t rescue it from bland. A fine sprinkle of poetry: an angel named Gracie; my sapped body a river that…

View original post 892 more words

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

What Artists Need to Grow: Interactions With Editors/ Publishers/Etc.

What Artists Need to Grow: Interactions With Editors/ Publishers/Etc. 

In this response, to Anne M. Hicks’ Nov. 15, 2012 Blog at annemhicks.wordpress.com, I’m going to focus specifically on the author/artist’s perspective, on the general intentions of publishers/editor’s comments, and on the need for proper positive reaction by authors/artists to assist them in their growth process of all their endeavors.

 

 As a writer and photographer, I know what it feels like to have my work (all of which is personal in one way or another) reviewed by friends and editors. Sometimes, especially when I was a novice writer, even mere suggestions on editing seemed like personal attacks on me as a person. However, as writers grow, so  do their desire to improve, which requires a positive attitude adjustment toward well-intentioned comments, especially those coming from editors and publishers.

 

Today, when I receive a comment on my poetry by a publisher, editor, or judge, I consider myself very fortunate. After all, they are not required to make any comments, especially when rejecting my work, but also about editing a piece of my writing whether accepted or not. The fact that an editor, etc., takes the time to comment on the piece says something special about both the editor and my piece, whether it be poetry, prose, or photography.

 

As artists, it’s also our duty and our mental health mantra to toughen our skin so that well-intentioned pin pricks to our work don’t end up feeling like chainsaw wounds. Artist should first look for the positive nature of comments that could go a long way in helping us grow in our field.

 

Sure, I’ve heard of an occasional slight by a publisher/editor, but the vast majority of comments are not offered up from this calloused and egocentric state of mind; rather, they’re given through a genuine desire to aid the art and, thereby, assist the artist, whether in visual or written genres.

 

Most editors/publishers/ and trusted workshoppers are not intending to slam an artist when they note an area that could use a healthy modification. It’s often difficult for novice writers and artists not to feel somewhat slighted at first, especially—as previously  noted—since all artistry is personal, arriving out of our core being. Nevertheless, these writers and other artists need, for this very reason, to receive comments and suggestions with an open and objective mind, rather than as one more personal attack from the world at large.  Growth and success as an artist requires a level of humbleness, a desire to improve regardless the cost, and a toughening of one’s skin so recommendations are interpreted as being just that and special rather than as personal affronts.

 

Beth


Beth A. Cagle
Embrace Life Creatively!
Poet-Editor-Educator-Photographer
Senior Editor of moonShine review

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

What Artists Need to Grow: Interactions With Editors/ Publishers/Etc.

What Artists Need to Grow: Interactions With Editors/ Publishers/Etc. 

In this response, to Anne M. Hicks’ Nov. 15, 2012 Blog at annemhicks.wordpress.com, I’m going to focus specifically on the author/artist’s perspective, on the general intentions of publishers/editor’s comments, and on the need for proper positive reaction by authors/artists to assist them in their growth process of all their endeavors.

 

 As a writer and photographer, I know what it feels like to have my work (all of which is personal in one way or another) reviewed by friends and editors. Sometimes, especially when I was a novice writer, even mere suggestions on editing seemed like personal attacks on me as a person. However, as writers grow, so  do their desire to improve, which requires a positive attitude adjustment toward well-intentioned comments, especially those coming from editors and publishers.

 

Today, when I receive a comment on my poetry by a publisher, editor, or judge, I consider myself very fortunate. After all, they are not required to make any comments, especially when rejecting my work, but also about editing a piece of my writing whether accepted or not. The fact that an editor, etc., takes the time to comment on the piece says something special about both the editor and my piece, whether it be poetry, prose, or photography.

 

As artists, it’s also our duty and our mental health mantra to toughen our skin so that well-intentioned pin pricks to our work don’t end up feeling like chainsaw wounds. Artist should first look for the positive nature of comments that could go a long way in helping us grow in our field.

 

Sure, I’ve heard of an occasional slight by a publisher/editor, but the vast majority of comments are not offered up from this calloused and egocentric state of mind; rather, they’re given through a genuine desire to aid the art and, thereby, assist the artist, whether in visual or written genres.

 

Most editors/publishers/ and trusted workshoppers are not intending to slam an artist when they note an area that could use a healthy modification. It’s often difficult for novice writers and artists not to feel somewhat slighted at first, especially—as previously  noted—since all artistry is personal, arriving out of our core being. Nevertheless, these writers and other artists need, for this very reason, to receive comments and suggestions with an open and objective mind, rather than as one more personal attack from the world at large.  Growth and success as an artist requires a level of humbleness, a desire to improve regardless the cost, and a toughening of one’s skin so recommendations are interpreted as being just that and special rather than as personal affronts.

 

Beth


Beth A. Cagle
Embrace Life Creatively!
Poet-Editor-Educator-Photographer
Senior Editor of moonShine review

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Breaking into Poetry: Suggestions for New Poets

Suggestions for Poets Who Want to be Successful
By Beth Ann Cagle

How does one become a better poet and serious writer? It’s a tough question, and the answers are unlimited. Although you may already be aware of some of the ideas in the article below, the suggestions are multi-fold. Here are some of the things successful poets have tried out to help them become better poets and more serious writers.

• Poets are on fire for poetry! They make it a major component in everyday life by reading and writing more poetry.
• They meet other poets. See what others are doing with their poetry, and make themselves known in the local community by joining poetry readings, classes, and workshops.
• They attend (and can teach) classes and workshops directed specifically at teaching modern poetry as they learn to work with new styles they discover. There are a wide variety of techniques for them to try: imagistic, naturalistic, surrealistic, lyrical, narrative, and concrete patterns–as well as traditional forms like sonnets, villanelles, sestinas, pantoums, ballads, and, of course, a variety of free verse styles.

• They compare what they are learning to their older work, perhaps even to the point of revising poetry they previously thought was complete. Whether or not one can revise old poems, writing new poems is essential to keeping anyone’s skills sharp.
• Revise, revise, revise! Very rarely does a poem come out finished in a first draft. They will often look for similar sounding words, but they don’t repeat the same word close in the poem (there are exceptions, of course).
• They will often set their new poem aside for a few days before coming back to it to experience it with new eyes and ears. They also read the poem aloud to hear how it rolls off the tongue.
• They submit to poetry journals, following their guidelines, after making themselves familiar with the content. Also, they pay attention to whether or not the journals accept simultaneous submissions, and they follow those rules.
• If they want a greater chance for a particular poem or poems to get published, they will choose journals that allow simultaneous submissions. If they want their poems to be published in some of the best known and respected journals, they accept that these usually do not take simultaneous submissions (there are exceptions, however).
• Entering contests is a good way to get their names out there, but some contests do not offer as great of a chance to be published as just sending to journals for publication alone. Many will enter anyway if the contest is a respectable one.
• They have toughened their skin to the fact that we all will receive many rejection letters. Even well-known poets get them in abundance.
• They stay away from poetry scams. These swindlers are only interested in getting your money by having you purchase the book you are published in. A good way to tell is to check if the book publishes numerous poems to a page as opposed to only one or two poems per page. Serious poets do not value these publications, and they avoid these scams. Novice poets should not be afraid to ask more experienced writers about scams.
• They ask other poets about ideas on how to improve their poetry and what works in making these poems publishable.
• They gain as much knowledge as possible about modern poets and their poetry, but they also learn about traditional poets and poetry from centuries ago. Poets create fresh writing, but it can often have roots in the past.
• They develop their own voice and style in poetry.
• They always make time to write!

These are suggestions you can use to help you reach your goals and become the poet you want to be. Although the above ideas are invaluable to the beginning serious poet, this is not a complete list. Poets and teachers of poetry are usually easy to talk with, and they will have more ideas on how successful poets accomplish their goals and on how you can accomplish your goals as well.

Don’t let the number of ideas overwhelm you. Instead, reflect on them and try them out one or two at a time until they become more like habits, enjoyable ones. Whatever you are doing, have fun doing it. Many good wishes on your journey.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment